Carlton Hall Farmhouse

From Rothwell Wiki



Carlton Hall Farmhouse is a 16th century home and Grade II listed building in the village of Carlton.[1] The home was formerly the manor house for the lords of Carlton[2] and has had extensive alterations, particularly in the 18th century.[1]

The house was the birth place of Thurstan Hunt (c.1555 - 3rd April 1601), a Catholic priest, who was hung, drawn and quartered in Lancashire after being captured while attempting to rescue a fellow priest, and who was beatified by Pope John Paul II on November 22nd 1987.[3]

History

16th Century

The farmhouse was likely constructed using a timber frame in the 16th century.[1] This building was nearly all wood.[4] The house was owned by the Hunt family, who were the lords of Rothwell until the reign of King Henry VIII.[2]

Thurstan Hunt

A blue plaque commemorating the life of Thurstan Hunt. The plaque reads: THURSTAN HUNT. The Blessed Thurstan Hunt was born here at Carlton Hall in 1555. He studied at Douai College, France, was ordained as a priest at Rheims in 1585, and then worked for 15 years in the North of England. He was captured in the Fylde area whilst attempting to rescue a fellow priest, Robert Middleton. They were transported to London for questioning before being returned to Lancaster where they were hanged, drawn and quartered on April 3rd 1601. Beatified by Pope John Paul II November 22 1987.
A blue plaque commemorating the life of Thurstan Hunt.
Photo © Mike Kirby (cc-by-sa/2.0)
In 1555, Thurstan Hunt was born at Carlton Hall Farmhouse.[3] Thurstan Hunt studied at Douay College, when it was briefly in Rheims[5], from 1583[6] and was ordained by the cardinal de Guise, on April 20th 1584. Hunt was sent on the English mission in 1585 and seems to have spent most of his time in Lancashire. Hunt attempted to rescue a fellow priest who was being taken to prison but failed and was sent to London with Robert Middleton (another Catholic priest in Lancashire). Hunt and Middleton were sent back to Lancashire where they were tried and sentenced to death for high treason[5]. They were hung, drawn and quartered on April 3rd 1601 and Hunt was beatified by Pope John Paul II on November 22nd 1987.[3]

18th Century

According to English Heritage, there were major additions to the house in the 18th century.[1]

19th Century

According to Batty, in 1836, one end of the wooden farmhouse was demolished and replaced.[4]

20th Century

In September 1996, the house sold for £100,000. [7]

In August 1997, the house sold for £125,000. [7]

21st Century

A blue plaque, sponsored by Rothwell 600, was installed by the Carlton Village Residents Association on the wall outside Carlton Hall Farmhouse to commemorate the life of Thurstan Hunt. The plaque reads:[3]

THURSTAN HUNT

The Blessed Thurstan Hunt was born here at Carlton Hall in 1555. He studied at Douai College, France, was ordained as a priest at Rheims in 1585, and then worked for 15 years in the North of England.

He was captured in the Fylde area whilst attempting to rescue a fellow priest, Robert Middleton. They were transported to London for questioning before being returned to Lancaster where they were hanged, drawn and quartered on April 3rd 1601.

Beatified by Pope John Paul II
November 22 1987.

In April 2018, the house sold for £699,950 and was listed as having 5 beds.[7]

In June 2022, the house sold for £875,000 and was listed as having 5 beds, 5 bathrooms and 2 reception rooms.[7]

Exterior

16th Century

Some of the original 16th century building remains. The three bays on the north-east axis of the building are from the 16th century house. Giles and Swan visited the house in 1978 and noted that the main bay of the three is more like a parlour than a hall, which suggests that the three bays are the surviving wing of a much larger house. The original building would have been timber-framed. The only remaining exterior feature of interest is the chimney stack to the rear of the first unit, of which the flow is party enclosed by a lean to.[1]

Later Additions

Undated image of Carlton Hall.
By kind permission of Leeds Libraries, Leodis.net.
Undated image of a cottage in the grounds of Carlton Hall.
By kind permission of Leeds Libraries, Leodis.net.

The timber-framed building was later clad in stone and at a later date rendered. There were major additions to Carlton Hall in the 18th century according to English Heritage,[1] although Batty says that the destruction of some of the wooden building and a major addition took place in 1836.[4] The later additions to the building are the added wing at right angles to the northern hall on the east side and an outshut to the rear.[1]

On the grounds is a detached building known as the coach house,[8] although this isn't listed in the property description for the most recent sale.[9]

Interior

The Historic England description of the interior states that it "contains two frames of post and truss construction, with some wallplates visible, and wattle and daub panelling recently exposed but now concealed and king post trusses with curved longitudinal bracing to the ridge secured by long pegs, and trenched purlins".[1]

On the ground floor there is a kitchen, a sun room, two living rooms, a bathroom suite and a utility room. There is also a cellar. On the ceiling of the main living room,[9] there is the shield of Queen Elizabeth I, with the letters "E.R.". It is enclosed within a garter, with the motto "Honi soit qui mal y pense". Batty describes there being "ornamental figures, and the beam has a running pattern upon it".[4]

The first floor is split into two wings, with three bedrooms in one and two in the other. All the bedrooms are double and have en-suites. There is also a W/C.[9]

External Links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 Anon. (no date). Carlton Hall - WYHER/10935. West Yorkshire Archive Service Online Catalogue. Available at: https://www.catalogue.wyjs.org.uk/CalmView/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&id=HER%2F45%2F145&pos=1 [Accessed: 10 June 2023]
  2. 2.0 2.1 Banks, W. (1871) Walks in Yorkshire; Wakefield and its neighbourhood. London: Longmans, Green, Reader and Dyer. Available at: https://archive.org/details/walksinyorkshir00bankgoog/ [Accessed: 10 June 2023]
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Kirby, M. (2009) Thurstan Hunt plaque, Geograph Britain and Ireland. Geograph Project Limited. Available at: https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/1316262 [Accessed: 10 June 2023].
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Batty, J. (1877) The History of Rothwell. Leeds: John Batty. Available at: https://archive.org/details/history-of-rothwell-1877-john-batty-optimized[Accessed: 12 June 2023].
  5. 5.0 5.1 Challoner, R. (1803) Memoirs of Missionary Priests, and other Catholics of both Sexes, that have suffered death in England on religious accounts from the year 1577 to 1684. Vol 1. Manchester: T. Haydock.
  6. Herbermann, C.G. et al. (eds.) (1913) ‘Ven. Thurstan Hunt’, The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York, New York: The Encyclopedia Press, Inc. Available at: https://en.wikisource.org/w/index.php?title=Catholic_Encyclopedia_(1913)/Ven._Thurstan_Hunt&oldid=4653545 [Accessed: 10 June 2023].
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 Anon. (no date). Property details for Carlton Hall Farm, Zoopla. Available at: https://www.zoopla.co.uk/property/uprn/72371329/ [Accessed: 10 June 2023].
  8. Anon. (no date). Property history of Carlton Hall Farm, Queen Street, Carlton, Wakefield WF3 3RF, 11th Apr 2018. Zoopla. Available at: https://www.zoopla.co.uk/property/carlton-hall-farm/queen-street/carlton/wakefield/wf3-3rf/25619283/ (Accessed: 17 June 2023).
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 Anon. (no date). Property history of Carlton Hall Farm, Queen Street, Carlton, Wakefield WF3 3RF, 21st Jun 2022. Zoopla. Available at: https://www.zoopla.co.uk/property/carlton-hall-farm/queen-street/carlton/wakefield/wf3-3rf/25619283/ (Accessed: 17 June 2023).

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